Hot air balloon lamp tutorial

So I finally got it done. The hot air balloon lamp tutorial. I really hope this helps some of you out but as a caution remember that I am not a electrician and the way I hang the lamp might not work out for you. Hopefully though you understand my idea and from there you can change it to the way it works out for you.

If you don’t know what lamp I’m talking about here is a link to the original post. So let start!

1. Start by making the basket. This is what your going to need.

Hot air balloon lamp tutorial

2. First tape over the tin can with the washi tapes. The use the decoupage glue. If you don’t have washi tapes, you can e.g. paint the cans. If you don’t have decoupage glue, I think that glue that just dries clear will do. I prefer to put some sort of glue on the tapes just to make sure that the tapes don’t start falling off when they start drying.

Hot air balloon lamp tutorial

3. After the can has dried, use the little screw driver to poke the holes at the very edge of the can. I used this screw driver since it has strong enough to go through the tin as well as the end result was clean. Remember to poke the holes in the correct places.

Hot air balloon lamp tutorial

4. Here’s a picture of one of the holes.Hot air balloon lamp tutorial

5. Do not cut the strings too short at this point. Then you have enough length to see how close the basket is to the lamp.

Hot air balloon lamp tutorial

6. Trust me. Use something that will help you push the thread through the small holes. Hot air balloon lamp tutorial

7. Do put a double knot so i does not fall off at any point. If you really want to make sure then add a dab of glue to the knot. Cut off the excess thread for a clean finish.

Hot air balloon lamp tutorial

8. Now you have all the strings in place. Time for the lamp.

Hot air balloon lamp tutorial

 

9. This is the lamp that I bought from Ikea. One of my readers did inform me that the U.S. Ikea does not sell them anymore but she did buy some off Ebay . But use your imagination. This isn’t the only lamp that works for this. In Finland they sell the white one only.

Hot air balloon lamp tutorial

 

10. Assemble the lamp.Hot air balloon lamp tutorial

 

11. Turn it upside down…

Hot air balloon lamp tutorial

 

12. Use the little screw driver again.

Hot air balloon lamp tutorial

13.  Now you can attach the tin can. Use the screw driver again to push the strings through the holes like we did in step 6.

Hot air balloon lamp tutorial

14. You can trim off the excess string bits and you’re pretty close already.

Hot air balloon lamp tutorial

 

15. make some decorations: garlands! You need:

Hot air balloon lamp tutorial

 

16. The desired length of the thread is up to you. About 60 cm threads are pretty good. Make as many as you like. I made two.Hot air balloon lamp tutorial

 

17. After you have cut the triangles, make a loop at the end of each thread. Four loops all together. Hot air balloon lamp tutorial

18. You can then attach the garlands to the lamp by the loops. The lamps legs are perfect for the loops.

Hot air balloon lamp tutorial

19. Next you are going to hang up the lamp. Note that this tutorial part only works for the room I have. If you don’t have the possibility to do it like me then you must think of another way.

You’re going to need 2 screw hooks and strong fishing line. I was able to screw the hook onto a curtain board that went across the room and a cupboard.

Hot air balloon lamp tutorial

20. This is the fishing line I used.

Hot air balloon lamp tutorial

21. here you can see a close up of the fishing line which I stretched across the space. the whole idea is that I do not want it to be visible.

Hot air balloon lamp tutorial

22. This is the curtain board that I wrote about.

Hot air balloon lamp tutorial

23. Now attach the lamp to the fishing line. Twist away.

Hot air balloon lamp tutorial

24. Since the lamp’s original light switch is nearly touching the roof and it will be covered by the clouds there is no point in using that. I solved it by adding one of those extension cords with a switch of their own. Now the switch is much closer to the ground. Looks quite messy when I took the picture but sort it out and it will be good.

Hot air balloon lamp tutorial

25. Drum roll…..it works!

Hot air balloon lamp tutorial

26. Now create the clouds. You need:

Hot air balloon lamp tutorial

27. The idea of the clouds is to make the ugly cord disappear.  Tie the loop very close to the hook so you can start making the clouds right from that point.

Hot air balloon lamp tutorial

28. Remember this. It’ll make the twisting a lot easier.

Hot air balloon lamp tutorial

29. Twist light. Otherwise the filling does not look fluffy like a cloud. Remember to turn on the light switch first!

Hot air balloon lamp tutorial

30. You can make more than one cloud. This time I did a small and big one.

Hot air balloon lamp tutorial

31. Remember the garlands. Add them by using the lamp’s legs.

Hot air balloon lamp tutorial

32. Phew…now enjoy and find a friend to fly in the basket.

Hot air balloon lamp

End of tutorial. I hope you got an idea of how I created the lamp. if you are still wondering how I put three of those lamps in one place then look at step 23. Here I twisted only one lamp around the fishing line. Then I twisted three cords. I first twisted one and then the second and so on. You just have to make sure you have the lamp at the correct height.

Hope this helped and don’t hesitate to ask if there is something still unclear.

Have a great day and go make a hot air balloon lamp.

– Alina


 

 

Advertisements
This entry was posted in DIY/ Crafts, Tutorial and tagged , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

19 Responses to Hot air balloon lamp tutorial

  1. Pingback: Magical light | Alina

  2. Jenna says:

    Thank you for the tutorial! I love your creation! I will have to search for some lamp shades to try and get the same effect. 🙂

    • alinakelo says:

      You’re welcome! There were a few on Ebay or than you could try your local flea markets online or not. Probably another paper lamp should also work. Hope you find a good lamp and it works out!

  3. Sarah says:

    How did you make the other 2 lamps colored?

    • alinakelo says:

      Hi Sarah. Actually I didn’t have to do anything. When I purchased these lamps Ikea sold these in multiple colors. Nowadays Ikea only sells them in white. But don’t worry. Search places like Ebay to find these lamps. You can also find round basic rice paper lamps from China which you can convert into lamps with a little work. Hope this helped. But ask away if something still comes up. 🙂

  4. jumpyjess says:

    These are some great ideas! Thank you for sharing! 😉

  5. laura says:

    Thank you so much for posting! We just finished hanging our lights in our baby girls nursery, just have to make the clouds. They look perfect in her room and we couldnt have done it without your inspiration!!

    • alinakelo says:

      Hi Laura! Congrats on your nursery room and I’m glad to hear that you liked the lamps and you have made some as well. I hope they bring you and your family joy for a long time.

  6. Lauren says:

    We don’t have an Ikea near me, so I had a friend mail me one of the lamps, so I can do a hot air balloon themed nursery for our little boy. Thanks so much for the idea!

  7. Vesna Pavić says:

    this is so creativ and beautiful ❤ i just love it

  8. I’m so excited to make these with my Mom next weekend for my travel theme nursery. I was able to find the lamps on Amazon! Such a wonderful idea. Thank you!

  9. Pingback: 10 Easy and Creative DIY Hacks For Decorating Kids Rooms -Tots to Travel Blog

  10. I made these this weekend and am so in love!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! I’d love to send you a photo of the finished product! Thanks for the tutorial!

  11. Pingback: 5 Frugal and Beautiful DIY Nursery Project Ideas | BLINQ Bytes

  12. Pingback: 6 Fun Lighting Ideas For Your Kids' Room | Screed

  13. Craft store says:

    When the Rashiwala brothers came to Singapore in 1925, they begun a minimal business, C. Rashiwala Bros, trading raw gemstones with nearby merchants and selling jewelry to wealthy local colonists. They started what is right now among the many region’s most esteemed company of semi-precious gems and jewelry, additionally C. Rashiwala Bros is South East Asia’s earliest and most trustworthy vendors of Swarovski items. This business continued until 1942 when WW2 broke out. The Rahiwala great grand-uncle returned to India along with his grand-son and the rest of the family. The grandfather remained behind in Singapore to protect and look after the shop. Life was tough during the Japanese occupation. In the past of the occupation, he hid inside the nearby forest throughout the day time, coming out only at night to look for food. At that time, the shop was looted, fired on & once partly set alight by a marauding mob. Penniless with what ever he could repair from the flames, he spread-out a small canvas in front of the store and placed the salvaged materials to sell. He was struggling to return immediately in to the shop as he was unable to pay for the $170 monthly leasing as well as maintenance to the destroyed store. A several weeks later, he migrated back again into the shop. Following the war and the drawback of Japanese troops in 1945, the store was refurbished with teak wood cabinetry and exhibit cabinets. The third generation Rashiwala also came back several years later to carry on his studies in Singapore. The current owner joined his dad in the business in 1956. At that time, they had unveiled trimmings along with some haberdashery products including sequins, beads, and many others. In 1967, Kantilal Gamanlal Rashiwala; wrote to M/s Swarovski and successfully grew to become their first supplier in S. E. Asia. In 1978, at 16 yr old, The fourth generation Rashiwala run the store from their own building at 100 Arab Street which they shifted into in 2004. They’ve incorporated a fair-bit from the old post-war teak wood furnishings from their previously rented store.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s